The Latest

Aug 17, 2014 / 2,586 notes
Aug 17, 2014 / 705,021 notes
insertwittytumblername:

How I vacuum when no one is home.
Aug 17, 2014 / 41 notes

insertwittytumblername:

How I vacuum when no one is home.

xvelvetheartsx:

Dead Poets Society on We Heart It.
Aug 17, 2014 / 40 notes

xvelvetheartsx:

Dead Poets Society on We Heart It.

cityofwishies:

Live in the Moment | via Tumblr en We Heart It.
Aug 17, 2014 / 81 notes

cityofwishies:

Live in the Moment | via Tumblr en We Heart It.

fuckyouthemagicalworld:

he said…
Aug 17, 2014 / 870 notes
thenortherneuropean:

The highlands in Scotland. Some of my ancestors came from here…of this I am very proud. Maybe this explains why i like the sound of bagpipes lol. Beautiful scenery. If you’ve ever seen the movie “Valhalla Rising” it was filmed in the highlands
Aug 17, 2014 / 105 notes

thenortherneuropean:

The highlands in Scotland. Some of my ancestors came from here…of this I am very proud. Maybe this explains why i like the sound of bagpipes lol. Beautiful scenery. If you’ve ever seen the movie “Valhalla Rising” it was filmed in the highlands

archaicwonder:

Hilton of Cadboll Stone
The Hilton of Cadboll Stone is a Class II Pictish stone discovered at Hilton of Cadboll, on the Tarbat Peninsula in Easter Ross, Scotland.
It is one of the most magnificent of all Pictish cross-slabs. On the seaward-facing side is a Christian cross, and on the landward facing side are secular depictions. The latter are carved below the Pictish symbols of crescent and v-rod and double disc and Z-rod: a hunting scene including a woman wearing a large penannular brooch riding side-saddle. Like other similar stones, it can be dated between the 6th to 9th centuries.
The stone was formerly on in the vicinity of a chapel just north of the village. It was removed to Invergordon Castle in the 19th century, before being donated to the British Museum. The latter move was not popular with the Scottish public, and so it was moved once more, to the Museum of Scotland, where it remains today. A replica designed and carved by Barry Grove was recently erected on the site.
photo by Davidmmac
Aug 17, 2014 / 118 notes

archaicwonder:

Hilton of Cadboll Stone

The Hilton of Cadboll Stone is a Class II Pictish stone discovered at Hilton of Cadboll, on the Tarbat Peninsula in Easter Ross, Scotland.

It is one of the most magnificent of all Pictish cross-slabs. On the seaward-facing side is a Christian cross, and on the landward facing side are secular depictions. The latter are carved below the Pictish symbols of crescent and v-rod and double disc and Z-rod: a hunting scene including a woman wearing a large penannular brooch riding side-saddle. Like other similar stones, it can be dated between the 6th to 9th centuries.

The stone was formerly on in the vicinity of a chapel just north of the village. It was removed to Invergordon Castle in the 19th century, before being donated to the British Museum. The latter move was not popular with the Scottish public, and so it was moved once more, to the Museum of Scotland, where it remains today. A replica designed and carved by Barry Grove was recently erected on the site.

photo by Davidmmac

dreamlabs:

A Pictish warrior
by John White (1585-1593). 
Aug 17, 2014 / 1,006 notes

dreamlabs:

A Pictish warrior

by John White (1585-1593). 

historicaltimes:

The Cremation of Gandhi. By: Henri Cartier Bresson. 1948.
Aug 17, 2014 / 204 notes

historicaltimes:

The Cremation of Gandhi. By: Henri Cartier Bresson. 1948.

bythegods:

Ares
Ares is well-known as the god of war, but we can get more specific than that. War has been a primary obsession of the human race for thousands of years, and there’s room for more than one divine aspect within its terrifying depths; Ares, specifically, was the Greek god of savagery, violence, and bloodlust in battle. 
While Athena (Ares’ sister) was a goddess of war, she was seen as the patron of tactics, discipline, camaraderie, and victory. She got the best of her frenzied brother in the Trojan war, and was more widely worshipped, being seen as less destructive and murderous. If wanton death and viciousness is your thing, send Ares a prayer or two. And also stay away from people, because you’re probably a dangerous lunatic.
Aug 9, 2014 / 964 notes

bythegods:

Ares

Ares is well-known as the god of war, but we can get more specific than that. War has been a primary obsession of the human race for thousands of years, and there’s room for more than one divine aspect within its terrifying depths; Ares, specifically, was the Greek god of savagery, violence, and bloodlust in battle.

While Athena (Ares’ sister) was a goddess of war, she was seen as the patron of tactics, discipline, camaraderie, and victory. She got the best of her frenzied brother in the Trojan war, and was more widely worshipped, being seen as less destructive and murderous. If wanton death and viciousness is your thing, send Ares a prayer or two. And also stay away from people, because you’re probably a dangerous lunatic.

Aug 9, 2014 / 361 notes